The Gospel According to Judas by Benjamin Iscariot

by Jeffrey Archer

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Written in close collaboration with one of the world's leading biblical scholars, Professor Francis J. Moloney, The Gospel According to Judas by Benjamin Iscariot throws new light on the mystery of Judas, including his motives for the betrayal and what happened to him after the crucifixion. At just over 22,000 words, it is roughly the same length as the four canonical Gospels. The many mysteries surrounding Judas for example, whether he really did commit suicide, as cited in The Gospel According to Matthew have long intrigued scholars and theologians. Together, the authors tell the story of Jesus, using the canonical texts as their basic point of reference, through the eyes of Judas and ostensibly written by his son Benjamin. They offer a plausible re-reading of the Christian tradition that throws into relief the tragedy of Judas, and the compassion of Jesus.


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Publisher: Macmillan Audio
Edition: Unabridged

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  • ISBN: 9781427218667
  • File size: 78187 KB
  • Release date: May 1, 2007
  • Duration: 02:42:50

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781427218667
  • File size: 78187 KB
  • Release date: May 1, 2007
  • Duration: 02:42:50
  • Number of parts: 3


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Written in close collaboration with one of the world's leading biblical scholars, Professor Francis J. Moloney, The Gospel According to Judas by Benjamin Iscariot throws new light on the mystery of Judas, including his motives for the betrayal and what happened to him after the crucifixion. At just over 22,000 words, it is roughly the same length as the four canonical Gospels. The many mysteries surrounding Judas for example, whether he really did commit suicide, as cited in The Gospel According to Matthew have long intrigued scholars and theologians. Together, the authors tell the story of Jesus, using the canonical texts as their basic point of reference, through the eyes of Judas and ostensibly written by his son Benjamin. They offer a plausible re-reading of the Christian tradition that throws into relief the tragedy of Judas, and the compassion of Jesus.


Expand title description text