Mcgee's Go to the Carnival, Billy Mill's $10,000,000

Fibber Mcgee and Molly

by RadioClassics, Inc. © 2005

Audiobook
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At 79 Wistful Vista there lived Fibber McGee, a fast talking man who was prone to exaggeration. Although he had radio audiences laughing for almost 25 years, his long-suffering wife, Molly, insisted, “T’aint funny McGee.” This incredible comedy featured a onslaught of outrageous characters, including two who created their own successful spin off shows: Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve, McGee’s bickering neighbor, and Beulah, who was played by a male actor. Also inhabiting Wistful Vista was a pesky little girl named Teeny, the snobby Mrs. Abigail Uppington, Greek restauranteur Nick Depopoulous, and subservient husband Wallace Wimple. Then, there was the McGee’s notorious closet, which seemed to have a life of it’s own. The running gag of the overstuffed closet that heaped random objects on Fibber, friends and family each time it was opened is one of the most memorable on radio.

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Publisher: Radio Classics, Inc.
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • File size: 13822 KB
  • Release date: June 10, 2005
  • Duration: 00:28:47

MP3 audiobook

  • File size: 13822 KB
  • Release date: June 10, 2005
  • Duration: 00:28:47
  • Number of parts: 1

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Languages

English

At 79 Wistful Vista there lived Fibber McGee, a fast talking man who was prone to exaggeration. Although he had radio audiences laughing for almost 25 years, his long-suffering wife, Molly, insisted, “T’aint funny McGee.” This incredible comedy featured a onslaught of outrageous characters, including two who created their own successful spin off shows: Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve, McGee’s bickering neighbor, and Beulah, who was played by a male actor. Also inhabiting Wistful Vista was a pesky little girl named Teeny, the snobby Mrs. Abigail Uppington, Greek restauranteur Nick Depopoulous, and subservient husband Wallace Wimple. Then, there was the McGee’s notorious closet, which seemed to have a life of it’s own. The running gag of the overstuffed closet that heaped random objects on Fibber, friends and family each time it was opened is one of the most memorable on radio.

Expand title description text